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Blog.

The Milkshake Experiment


Blog posts - milkshakes
Photo by: Image via Thinkstock

Don’t you love it when a study surfaces that suggests there are other contributing factors to our chocolate-covered pretzels addiction than just a lack of willpower?

A new study published last month suggests sugary foods, white bread and other processed carbs influence the parts of our brain that are responsible for hunger, cravings and reward.

Enter the Milkshake Experiment

Lactose intolerant friends relax yourselves the study’s already been done. We just want to share the results with you.

The conductors of said milkshake experiment, enlisted 12 obese men and fed them two different vanilla milkshakes on two separate occasions. The participants couldn’t tell the difference; the shakes looked and tasted identical and contained the same amount of calories, fat, carbohydrates and protein except one shake was made with high-fructose corn syrup (which is 50 per cent fructose, roughly the same as regular table sugar) So what did this experiment show?

As expected the sugary shake saw blood sugar levels sky rocket immediately. What was particularly interesting, though, was that several hours later blood sugar levels plummeted and there was greater activation in parts of the brain that regulate cravings, reward and addictive behaviours. The differences in blood flow to these regions of the brain were notably substantial between the two different shakes.

There are two major things that we want you to take from this (and it’s not to conduct your own milkshake experiment).

  1. Finally there is research that supports the argument that sugar – and sugar alone – causes cravings. It might sound pretty obvious, but its only now that we have some solid proof.
  2. Limiting sugar is the best way to control cravings. Also an obvious statement, but what is great about this study is that it assures us that desperately seeking out sugary foods is a neurological reaction to the amount of sugar we consume, not a lack of willpower.

So now that you’re feeling all empowered let us offer you a helping hand.

We’ve just announced the launch of our new online I Quit Sugar Program you can check it our here.

Otherwise you can check out our I Quit Sugar eBook and print book here.

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