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A bluffer’s guide on how long to freeze your food for

By Brooke Rooney |


I Quit Sugar - A bluffer's guide on how long to freeze your food for

From actually making your freezer more economical, to saving money and preventing food wastage, the benefits for freezing your food are pretty dang awesome. And it’s safe to assume that those of us here at IQS headquarters might have a tiny bit of an obsession with our freezers.

From favourite freezer hacks to things you probably didn’t know you could freeze, we lay all responsibility for our freezer-frenzy (say that ten times fast) on our favourite boss lady, Sarah Wilson. For those of you who aren’t aware, she’s pretty much the queen of clever things to do with ice cube trays, not to mention how to freeze things.

As far as food safety is concerned, freezing food for any length of time is safe. However, flavour and visuals can most definitely be compromised. So, for the sake of our taste buds (and aesthetics) we thought it was important to share with you Sarah’s freezer length advice from her book, I Quit Sugar For Life.

How long to freeze your food for:

  • Meat soups: 2 months.
  • Vegetable soups: 3 months.
  • Cooked meat: 2 months. (If possible, slightly undercook any meat that is going to be reheated.)
  • Cooked fish: 1 month.
  • Partially cooked and frozen vegetables: 3-6 months. (Generally they don’t need to be defrosted prior to cooking, although some leafy green vegetables are much easier to separate if defrosted a little bit first.)
  • Baked muffins: 3 months. (Freeze in individual bags or in a single container with sheets of freeze paper between the muffins so they can be easily separated.)

We’d actually recommend printing this list off and sticking it either outside or inside your freezer! You never know when this information will be handy, so keep it on standby.

But a quick word of warning from Sarah: “Watch out for freezer burn – make sure everything is covered, filling containers to the top. Sauces and pesto can be stored with a layer of oil on top. Cooked beans and rice can be topped off with water.”

What are some other freezer tips  you’ve come up with? We’d love to know!

Please be respectful of other participants in the conversation. We'd love you to keep your comments respectful, friendly and relevant. Differences of opinion are welcome, but trolling and abuse of other commentators and the IQS editorial team is not and will result in blacklisting.

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