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Is the rise of food delivery apps making us fat?

By Alexandra McCarthy |


I Quit Sugar: Is the rise of food delivery apps making us fat?

  • The takeaway food market experienced a 56.1 per cent rise in sales last year thanks to food delivery services such as Deliveroo, Foodora and UberEATS.
  • 12 per cent of millennials have even admitted that being deeply engrossed in a Netflix binge was enough motivation to order food in.
  • A YouGov study which surveyed over 1000 adults in Australia’s capital cities also found that one in two adults have ordered food online or through an app!

The advent of food delivery apps has undoubtedly led to a boom in the takeaway food industry, but what effect is it having on our health?

Unsurprisingly, people aged 18–34 who live in inner-city areas are the biggest users of online food delivery services, as they are “cash-rich” but time-poor.

Professor Anna Peeters, a public health researcher at Deakin University, agrees that these services do make it easier for people to eat badly.

“There’s something quite wrong with our lifestyles. All foods that 10 or 20 years ago would have been considered treat foods – highly processed foods with little nutritional values – are really abundant,” she said.

“We can get anything we want, whenever we want. Which means we’re consuming a lot more.”

Anna reveals how takeaway portions are often larger than what you would cook at home too and even the “healthy” options are filled with more fat, sugar and salt than their home-cooked counterparts.

While we’re all about JERFing – and home-cooked meals – we know that it’s not possible to cook every meal you eat. Instead, it’s about being savvy about what you order when you do choose to eat out (or order in!). Be mindful of how much processed food you are consuming and portion sizes. While delivery services are undoubtedly convenient, we need to ensure that our health – and our waistlines – don’t suffer the consequences.

Is it time to reconsider your takeaway order?

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